News

Professional associations affirm commitment to improving quality of maternal and newborn health care

Health care professional associations (including FIGO), at the launch of the Network for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, have endorsed four joint statements calling all their member associations to assume a critical leadership role in advocating and implementing...

FIGO reaffirms support for 2017’s International Day of Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation (6 February 2017)

The International Day of Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) - held each 6 February - encourages global awareness of FGM/C and promotes its eradication. Please click here to view the statement. View FIGO’s film on FGM...

Spreading the word about Essential Interventions

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Some 119,000 children born with Foetal Alcohol Syndrome

An estimated 119,000 children are born with Foetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) each year, according to a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, Canada. The study provides the first estimates of the proportion of women who drink during their pregnancies, as well as...

IVF clinics' success rates ‘may be misleading’

According to a new study, success rates displayed on the majority of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) clinic websites are potentially misleading because these clinics can “cherry pick” their results. Jack Wilkinson, medical statistician at the University of Manchester, UK, said that a ban...

Blood pressure in mother may predict sex of baby

A new study has revealed that a woman’s blood pressure before pregnancy may be related to the sex of the baby she conceives. Scientists from the Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada, followed a unique group of young women who were intending to conceive in the near future and evaluated the...

Progesterone could be key to preventing recurrent miscarriage

A new study has revealed that progesterone could be key to preventing recurrent miscarriage. According to researchers at the Yale School of Medicine and University of Illinois at Chicago, US, progesterone could give hope to women who suffer multiple miscarriages in the first four to five weeks of...

Scientists discover structure of immature Zika virus

Researchers have determined the high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus, which they have said is a step towards better understanding how the virus infects host cells and spreads. The scientists at Purdue University, Indiana, US, explained that Zika belongs to a family of viruses called...

European women having fewer children

A new report has revealed that women across Europe are having fewer children and that they are having them at later ages. The report, by France’s National Institute of Demographic Studies, has found that “fertility in Europe has reached low levels: women born in 1974 had 1.7 children on...

Yellow fever vaccine linked to breast cancer risk reduction

Researchers at Italy’s University of Padova have claimed that the yellow fever vaccine could potentially reduce the risk of breast cancer. They have suggested that administering the yellow fever vaccine to women aged between 40 and 54 could halve the risk of developing breast cancer. During...

Mammograms linked to breast cancer overdiagnosis

Mammograms may result in healthy women being given unnecessary treatment for breast cancer, according to new research from the Nordic Cochrane Center and Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark. The new study has provided evidence that links routine screening for breast cancer to an over-diagnosis of...

Existing drug could prevent spread of triple-negative breast cancer

New research has revealed that breast cancer metastasis may be prevented by a class of drugs that have already been approved in the US. Metastasis is the process by which cancer spreads. Researchers at the US’ Mayo Clinic have identified that enzyme pathway CDK4/6 regulates a cancer...

Heartburn medication linked to asthma in children

New research has suggested that children born to mothers who take heartburn medication during pregnancy could face a greater risk of asthma. A review of studies performed by researchers at the UK’s University of Edinburgh found that children whose mothers were prescribed medicines to treat...